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Simple and Easy Japanese Shojin Cooking

Masako Takahashi (Padmavati)Sunday, January 14, 2018
12:30 –3:30 pm
Tuition: $30.00 (Member $25.00)

The Buddhist vegetarian—Learn the essentials of shojin cooking, using simple winter recipes for:

  • Rice dish
  • Soup dish
  • Pickels
  • Tofu dish
  • Vegetable dish

Devotional or temple cooking, known as shojin ryori, hones the concept of “harmony of food” into a set of offerings that are based on Buddhism’s inherent respect for living a life that eschews doing harm. This type of cuisine became popular in the early 11th century when Buddhist monks used this way of “earnest commitment” to procure, prepare, serve and eat their meals. At its most fundamental nature, shojin ryori is vegan, consisting of no animal products, uses gentle seasonings and reduces waste as much as possible. A typical meal consists of a few vegetables such that all parts are used, the leaf, the root, the skins, prepared using simple techniques like blanching, simmering and braising, along with rice, soup, pickles, beans, legumes and tofu. Each item is prepared simply, without strong tastes such as garlic, chilies or wasabi. The entire meal is prepared with quiet thoughtfulness and eaten with reverence. Restaurants that serve shojin ryori meals offer more creative versions of this honest, simple food and are becoming more popular as people are gravitating towards a plant-based diet.

Limited to 7 participants. SOLD OUT!

Masako Takahashi (Padmavati)

Padmavati graduated from Sivananda Yoga Teacher Training course (TTC) in 2008 and the Advanced Yoga Teacher Training course (ATTC) in 2009. She taught Yoga for seniors from 2008 to 2014 at Moss Rehabilitation Center in Philadelphia. She teaches:

• Gentle Yoga
• Chair Yoga
• Strength & Balance for Seniors
• Zumba Gold (dance class for seniors) 
• Silver Sneakers Workout program
• Laughter Yoga
• Intermediate Chair Yoga
• Advanced Yoga for seniors

She also has experience working with recovering alcoholics and people with addiction issues. She has taught Yoga in a Japanese hospital and been involved with teaching Yoga at the Japanese AA. She is the founder of the Senior Yoga Instructors Association (SYIA) in Tokyo, Japan, which organizes volunteer activities to teach Chair Yoga in Japanese day-service centers.

She is an excellent cook, proficient in the art of many vegetarian cuisines.